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6 New National Park Natural Landmarks Worth Photographing

July 1, 2011 Favorite Places, Travel 4 Comments

Written by: Charlie Borland

It is always a nice surprise when the National Park Service adds more lands to its inventory of protected areas. Recently, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced the addition of 6 Natural Areas for protection and this is always good news to nature photographers.

Every National Park has been photographed to death and the inventory of amazing images is vast. So when there are new additions to the system this generates news and stories and increases the needs for photography from these locations.

The additions are part of President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors Initiative designed to develop a conservation ethic in the 21st century.

The six new natural areas are: Barfoot Park in the Chiricahua Mountains of southern Arizona, Golden Fossil Areas west and north of Golden, Colo., Hanging Lake National Natural Landmark is east of Glenwood Springs, Colo.; Kahlotus Ridgetop National Natural Landmark is in Palouse country four miles north of Kahlotus, Wash.; Round Top Butte National Natural Landmark is near Medford, Ore.; and Island National Natural Landmark is located  in east-central Oregon.

The following descriptions of each location came from Kurt Repanshek of National Parks Traveler:

  • Barfoot Park in the Chiricahua Mountains of southern Arizona supports an unusual mix of Sierra Madre and Rocky Mountain flora and fauna that includes four pine species and 18 other tree species. It also includes more than 15 acres of talus slopes, along with three meadows and two permanent springs. The landmark encompasses 680 acres of federal land managed by the U.S. Forest Service.
  • The 19-acre Golden Fossil Areas west and north of Golden, Colo., were designated as an extension to the existing Morrison Fossil Area National Natural Landmark, and will now be known as the Morrison-Golden Fossil Areas National Natural Landmark. The Golden Fossil Areas are among the most important paleontological sites in the Front Range and the western United States. They are known internationally as the only sites in the world to have produced a number of unique fossil footprints representing reptiles, birds, and mammals.
  • Hanging Lake National Natural Landmark is located along I-70, east of Glenwood Springs, Colo. The site is an outstanding example of a lake formed by travertine deposition. The lake and associated falls support a rare wetland ecosystem, including hanging gardens. The 72-acre site is situated within the White River National Forest.
  • Kahlotus Ridgetop National Natural Landmark is a remnant of the Palouse Prairie located about four miles north of Kahlotus, Wash. The Palouse Prairie is the most endangered and the most altered landscape in the inland Pacific Northwest. Approximately 1 percent of the original prairie remains and occurs in small fragments in developed landscapes. This 240-acre site is managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources.
  • Round Top Butte National Natural Landmark includes a basaltic butte, flat volcanic plains and small hills near Medford, Ore. Its vegetation is a mix of dry grassland, ponderosa pine, white oak and buck brush. The habitats are exceptional because they are dominated by native bunchgrasses. The new landmark encompasses 747 acres in two parcels: an established Research Natural Area managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and a preserve managed by The Nature Conservancy.
  • The Island National Natural Landmark is located on an isolated plateau at the confluence of the Deschutes and Crooked rivers in east-central Oregon. This 208-acre site supports one of the best known and least disturbed examples of native juniper savanna located within the Columbia Plateau. The Island is also a designated Research Natural Area, and is jointly managed by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service.

If you have visited any of these park areas and have some great photography and would like to show it here, drop us an email at pronaturephotographer@gmail.com.

Related posts: 14 New Locations for Marketable Outdoor Images

Book on National Parks:

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Currently there are "4 comments" on this Article:

  1. Glenn Zumwalt says:

    It is too bad that they waited so long to create the Island National Natural Landmark. There used to be a great state park at the confluence of the Deschutes and Crooked Rivers. It was destroyed by the creation of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River. We camped there many times in the mid 50′s and early 60′s.

    If you didn’t know about it, it was hard to find. You drove across the plateau for miles until you came to the edge of the Crooked River Canyon. The road wound down the canyon wall until you reached the river. There was a beautiful river mixed woodland that was 20 to 30 degrees cooler than the top. We would spend a week or two at a time there enjoying the peace and quiet of nature. Never many other campers there.

    Glenn Zumwalt

  2. Jerry Greer says:

    My only issue with list is there is NOTHING east on the Mississippi!

  3. Luann Holst says:

    I am glad NPS is adding more units, but I sure wish they would take care of some of the ones they have already. For example, the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, a unit of the NPS was recently named one of the 10 most endangered river system in the United States. Shame on NPS. The Riverways is turning into a gravel bottomed cess pool from human and horse waste. ATV abuse is out of control. The NPS management response to degraded areas is to put in a road and call it a ‘primitive campsite”.

  4. Bella cruse says:

    I love the greenery all around. I am a traveling freak guy so every year I go on a family holiday with my loved ones. Barfoot Park in the Chiricahua Mountains is really beautiful with amazing uneven landscapes. I had been there few years ago and I must say it was an amazing experience.

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