Here’s One Photography Idea That Sells in Today’s Markets

It’s well known in the business of photography, that photographs of news worthy subjects sell and sometimes very well. I’ve written about this before and the need for outdoor photographers to create images the markets will want.

Paparazzi’s for example, have been known to make a fortune capturing images of celebrities in ‘news making’ situations. With some foresight and good ideas, so can nature photographers.

Outdoor photographers shoot just about every subject that has to do with the outdoors, nature, and how humans interact with the outdoors, but often they lack that news making ingredient. Those images often languish waiting for a buyer, if there ever is one. So what should you shoot? Here are some ideas.

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Are You Working Hard to Be an Average Photographer?

I am in Arizona and the sunrise this morning was quote colorful. I kept thinking that I should have been out there to shoot it. It certainly would not cost me anything other than the time to go out and shoot. And I love to photograph!

I often ask myself; just what should I photograph or create that will earn me some money? Should I rise early every day, or most days that I am here, and go capture the sunrise? It is impossible to predict what might be discovered and immortalized in a digital file from a click of the shutter.  But one thing is certain: you won’t capture any great images if you are not out there!

That’s the goal: great images! Great Images that sell! But just what is a great image for today’s market? The bulk of what you see seems average. So I ask myself again: what should I photograph that will make a great image that sells? Should I go ahead and go shoot sunrise, not for the joy, but for my business? I am often torn. My career includes many episodes of feeling guilty when I saw something and I was not out there to capture it. That fear of missing out.

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How to Add a Sense of Scale to Your Landscape Photographs

When the landscape before us is wide and far reaching and stretches to the horizon, it is natural to want to frame our image to ‘take it all in.’ Many grand landscapes are captured just like this.

Sometimes to add a sense of visual depth we bring a foreground object up close in the frame to provide a better sense of how deep the scene is. However, on some occasions, your camera position may not lend itself to framing something close to the camera and it is these scenes that might require a new approach to providing that sense of grandeur.

Placing a subject close to the camera generally requires a wide angle lens and while that helps bring that foreground subject into the frame, it also can visually ‘push’ the grand scene in the background further away. But if you are zooming out to capture a segment of the grand scene, you leave out most foreground details and this can leave your image lacking that sense of immensity.

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How to Find the Magic In Winter Photography

For many photographers who live in the Northern hemisphere it is winter time and with a new season comes new opportunities to photograph.

Winter conditions can be just as exciting to photograph as the spring, summer, and fall, the conditions can present some challenges.

It’s obvious that snowy or icy winter conditions mean cold and preparing for those temperatures is a given: dress warm and protect your gear from getting wet. Beyond those, there are technical and creative considerations for great winter photography.

These include Exposure, White Balance, Contrast, and Lighting.

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Why Concept Photography is King?

Years ago a client showed me a corporate annual report produced for a financial investment company. The cover photo on the annual report was a stand of giant Sequoia trees shot vertically. The camera angle was from ground level and the lower half of the picture was the forest floor. Centered in the frame and close to the camera was a Sequoia seedling sprouting up through the forest floor with the ancient monarchs in the background. It was a beautiful shot!

The theme for the annual report was ‘Planting The Seeds For Long Term Growth’ and the client no doubt chose this image because it fit the concept they were looking for. The seedling in the foreground represented ‘planted seeds’ while the old growth trees in the rear of the photo represented ‘long term growth.’  Clients often search for stock images that speak visually and convey a specific message related to a theme and in this example it was a photo combining the old trees and the new tree.

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How To Write and Photograph for Foreign Travel Markets

Photographers are visual storytellers similar to filmmakers and writers. While many photographers looking to expand their business are choosing to put their HD dSLR to work creating video, others are choosing writing to tell their stories. Photography and writing have always made sense for outdoor photographers.

When you think about it, somewhere online is a great photograph of just about every location of interest to travelers making stock photography a tough business. While it is often said that ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’ in some cases a photograph without supporting text might not tell the complete story while a written article without photography may have less appeal to a reader. Photographs sell magazines and convince readers that a story is worth reading, making writing and photography a perfect marriage.

Since many photographers travel to photograph and then promote their images to the editorial markets, they can increase their sales in both domestic and foreign markets by offering photo/text packages. Editors have always been interested in working with qualified photographer/writers who could provide the total package. The ability to write is important and can be learned, but teaming up with an established writer is another option.

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5 Tips for Creating Worthless Photography

Not every photographer is in the business to license their imagery and earn an income and profit, but for those photographers who are working hard to make a decent living, a strategy for success is crucial.

As we know creating great photography is only one small part of success as a professional nature photographer.  You also need a strategy for successfully marketing and meeting the needs of image buyers.  Images that created with more than the ‘pretty picture’ mindset can and often do perform better in the markets. But maybe that is not important.

Bottom line is if the imagery is not selling it could be that you are creating worthless photography and why it is worthless could be for many reasons and maybe these:

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How Photographers Can Use Social Media to Promote Their Work

This was a guest post by Richard McMunn/How2become

A photographer’s portfolio is their livelihood and these days, thanks to social media, it’s never been easier to let the world see your work. Of course, that also means that every other photographer you’re competing with also has the potential to show off his or her portfolio. This means that if you want a competitive edge you might have to stop thinking like a photographer for a moment and imagine yourself as a marketer.

Valuable Exposure

Dedicating a couple of hours to social media every week will either help you realise your dreams of becoming a professional photographer or give your business the boost it needs to grow to the next level. Time is usually the only investment it takes – you don’t need to spend money to have accounts with any of the social media platforms, making it a really cost-effective way to market your business.

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Getting the Big Break in Photography

by Carl Battreal

When I began my career as a photographer, twenty two years ago, I dreamt that someday there would be a career event that would tip the balance from being a struggling photographer to a superstar.  This “big break” would send me into the halls of photographic fame with the legends I admired.

The first of many “big breaks” came when I was twenty four years old. The prominent photography journal Lenswork, featured my portfolio. While at the same time, a leading gallery in the Monterey Bay area gave me a solo exhibit.

Immediately, my prints sales rocketed and I thought, “This is it, I am now big time!

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